First Chamberlain Association of America (CAA1) (1897-1961) Materials

A short history of that organization- this file gives the reader a concise, understanding of the efforts to create a “composite” Chamberlain family tree more than 100 years ago.

HISTORY OF THE EFFORTS TO PROVIDE AN INVENTORY FOR THE CHAMBERLAIN COLLECTION by George Richard Chamberlin

 Roster of CAA1 Members  This links to a list of the earliest members & associates (numbered 1 through 315) of the original Chamberlain Association of America, as transcribed from the 32-page hand-written Membership Roster book, which was begun in 1898 and appears to quit after about 1903. Most of these 315 persons, and 127 more persons after about 1903 (unnumbered below) were also listed in the CAA Annual Reports, published by the association between 1899 and 1911. Names of additional members after 1910 are available from the Corresponding Secretary, Pat Sugg. 

 Gray Banker Boxes –  The materials gathered by the CAA1 consist of organizational correspondence, membership applications, genealogies and family histories, and photographs, etc..  The first step in re-organizing them was to place similar items in file folders.  These folders are placed in the banker boxes.  The collection fills 49 gray boxes in the New England Historic and Genealogical Society (NEHGS), Boston, Mass.  The above link will show you  how they have been more logically grouped at NEHGS.  To see a sample of the detailed report, here is a link to gray box 37.

Black Research Notebooks –  The members of the CAA1 conducted their research by visiting city hall, county courthouse, or other local centers of information.  Armed with ~5″x7″ loose leaf notebooks they scoured the records and jotted down notes on each Chamberlain cited in the documents.  These research notes were to form the foundation of their History and Genealogy of the Chamberlain surname.  There are approximately 71 books in the collection at NEHGS.  Click  the above link  for a descriptive table of those books.  Researchers visiting NEHGS will find this useful when filling out a document “call slip”.  To see a sample of the detailed contents, here is a link to Black Book 11 (MAINE, STATE, COUNTY, TOWN, HISTORIES AND MORE: 1750-1935)